Carlsbad Caverns

Carlsbad Caverns is one of the most unique National Parks in America. Yes there is Yosemite, Yellowstone, the Grand Canyon, etc and they are all amazing (and you should go visit them). Carlsbad stands out from the rest in that this national park is mostly underground.  It is reported that Will Rogers called Carlsbad Caverns “The Grand Canyon with a roof over it” and I think that is the perfect analogy.

Like most National Parks these days, we had to book our entrance tickets in advance. You can still use your annual pass to get in but you must book an entrance time. We opted for early in the morning as once you are in side there is no time limit on leaving so the middle of the day the cave can get quite crowded. You will check in at the front desk to confirm your entrance ticket (and show your annual pass or pay the entrance fee) and then you are directed back toward the elevator that will take you down into the Big Room. What is unique about the elevator is that it will show you how many feet you are descending. 

You will descend 750ft in total through solid limestone. Another option to enter the cave is via the natural entrance trail. This is a 1.25 mile trail that starts with descending switchbacks all the way down to the first discovered entrance. It is fairly steep so you will have to decide what is best for your visit. Either way you end up in the Big Room and it is stunning.

The most common trail inside the Cavern is the Big Room Trail which is 1.25 miles long. About half way through this trail there is a bailout point which allows you to cut through and make the route shorter. Warning: There are only bathrooms near the elevators. Once you’ve started the trail there is no turning back. We may have had to hustle through the last 1/4 mile as a kiddo really needed to go despite us using the restroom before we started. 

The trail was fairly easy but there are wet spots everywhere. The beginning portion of the trail is wheelchair accessible but you will have to take the shortcut portion to return and can’t do the full loop. Closed toe shoes are recommended. Low lighting is used throughout the cavern which might be a concern for some. 

Besides the rush to the bathroom at the end, the kids really enjoyed being inside the cave. They became absolutely fascinated with bats. 

The visitor center above the Caverns was very well done. There was fun interactive displays and a special area for junior rangers to finish up their booklets.

Overall we had a great and smooth experience at Carlsbad Caverns. But our adventure didn’t end there. We took a short detour over to Guadalupe Mountains National Park.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park

While doing research on our trip to Carlsbad, I stumbled upon Guadalupe Mountains National Park. It is located in Texas so I hadn’t been considering it for our New Mexico road trip. However, it is just across the state line and is actually only 45 minutes from Carlsbad Caverns. We decided we had to go check it out. 

We arrived at the Pine Springs Visitor Center in the middle of a snow storm. In my mind, we were going even farther south and into Texas and therefore it would be hot. Snow was not exactly on my radar. However, mother nature had other plans.

Needless to say, all of our hiking plans were thrown aside. We were able to go into the visitor center but the main part was closed and only a small shop area was open. 

For those of you that arrive when the weather is nice, there is a short Pinery Trail that is paved and is supposed to be an easy hike with kids. The most popular trail in the park is the Devil’s Hall which is 3.8 mile round trip. This trail also starts at the Pine Springs Visitor Center. Another place we were planning to stop was the Frijole Ranch Museum. We were planning to hike the Manzanita Spring trail as well which starts from the Museum. It is only a 1/2 mile trail that is easy for children. A slightly longer and more difficult hike is the Smith Spring Trail loop that also leaves from the ranch area. It is 2.3 miles but there is supposed to be a tiny waterfall and shaded area at the end. But again…..snow.

After having a picnic lunch in the car and realizing the snow was not letting up, we decided to head back to Carlsbad. We didn’t even get to see El Capitan (the most popular mountain in the park) due to the clouds 😦 We did get a small glimpse of the coral reef mountains on the way back into town. Maybe next time Guadalupe!

For Your Trip

  • Don’t forget to book those entrance tickets for the Cavern. The tickets come out 4 weeks in advance.
  • There are guided tours into other areas of the Caverns but those also need to be booked in advance.
  • The bats are not at Carlsbad year round. They are only there from late May to early October. When they are at the cave there are nightly bat programs and an amphitheater that you can watch them leave the cave.  Pretty amazing stuff!
  • There are not a lot of food options for either Carlsbad Caverns or Guadalupe Mountains. I highly recommend you bring all food and water with you….and maybe a roll of toilet paper.
  • The masking requirements are changing frequently so check on the website before heading over to the Caverns.

Happy Trails!

Roswell

The drive from Santa Fe to Carlsbad, New Mexico is long. Empty fields for 4 1/2 hours. The one thing to look forward to is the pitstop at Roswell.

I’m sure you all know the story.  A mysterious object crashed into a field outside of Roswell in the summer of 1947. Was it a UFO? A weather balloon? Spycraft? The truth seems to be a bit muddled but the city of Roswell is sticking with UFO and they have bought into the story 100%.  

Every part of town is Alien themed. That includes the McDonald’s shaped like a spaceship and the local minor league baseball team (Roswell Invaders) sporting an Alien Head in the middle of their team logo. Most of the main attractions are on Main Street, including the spaceship McDonald’s. 

We were a little short on time during our stop so we had to pick between the International UFO Museum or the Roswell UFO Spacewalk. There was an alien autopsy scene at the International UFO museum that I thought might be a little intense for the kids so we opted for the Spacewalk.

The Roswell UFO Spacewalk is this super adorable little place put together by a charming couple. They obviously worked very hard on this blacklight walk through. Entrance fee was very reasonable and you can walk through as many times as you would like. If you have little kids, this is the stop for you. I loved this place, I loved the owners, and I loved that they seemed to do it all just for fun. 

This was a great stop to stretch our legs, do some tacky tourists shopping, and then get back on the road to Carlsbad. 

For Your Trip

You have to get a picture by the Roswell sign. There are signs at 4 different entrances into town and all of them are a little different. Google which one you want to stop at but you need to get that picture. Another random picture you may want to get is a piece of art called Cowboy Ruckus by John Cerney. This is located north of Roswell (about 70 miles or so). 

The cowboys are 18ft tall

Roswell is a good sized town. You could probably spend a whole day there as there are several parks in the area including Bottomless Lake State park and museums including Roswell Museum and a Contemporary Art Museum. The International UFO Museum looks like a great stop if you have older kids. New attractions also seem to be popping up everyday so make sure to stop at the Roswell Visitors Center for the latest info. All the major grocery store chains are in town so stock up before you head out into those open fields again. And don’t forget to watch the skies on the way out of town 😉

Bandelier National Monument

Bandelier National Monument is one of my favorite places. We have been here many times and keep coming back. It is just an engaging park that really draws the kids in and focus their attention on history, hiking, and having some fun. 

Our latest trip to Bandelier was in March 2022. We lucked out with some beautiful, cool weather along with sunshine. Even though March is technically the off season, we still made sure to get to the parking lot at the Visitor Center early to snag a spot. We aren’t the only ones that love this place. The most popular trail is the Pueblo (or Main) Loop Trail that starts directly behind the visitors center. 

This trail is 1.4 miles and is fairly smooth until you get to some sites in which you will want to climb up. There are some very uneven steps, tight spaces and ladders. The ladders are the best part. 

You can go around the step/climbing portion if needed. You can view the cliff houses from the lower portion and then both sections will meet up at the lower cliff dwellings and long houses. I highly recommend going up to the cliff houses and climbing the houses if possible. The views are worth it.

The long houses are interesting as well with some paint still visible.

You can retrace your steps at the end of the trail or loop through via the Nature trail to return back to the Visitor Center. The Nature trail offers more shade and has a little creek running by it. So that is always our choice for the return. 

If you visit in the Spring, I would recommend the Falls Trail to see the winter runoff. The falls can dry up in the summer. This trail is more difficult and honestly I wouldn’t recommend it with small children. Also check for ice or snow on the trail due to recent weather. This trail starts near the visitor center so you can decide if the conditions are right for you after you arrive. 

For Your Trip

Its important to note that Bandelier is an extremely popular spot. In the off season, you can drive down the canyon to the visitor center and park but get there early. In the summer, you must take a shuttle if arriving between 9am and 3pm. The shuttle starts at the White Rock Visitor Center. This is located 20 min away from the Bandelier visitor center and you will most likely pass it first if you are coming in from Santa Fe. So check your watch when you are in White Rock to save yourself a long trip into the canyon and back. 

Bandelier is 1 hr from Santa Fe. There are limited services during parts of this drive with basically nothing between White Rock and the entrance to the Monument. I recommend checking your fuel gauge and bringing some snacks/packed lunch. There is a cafe at the Bandelier Visitor Center, which had lovely coffee. However, this place can get crowded. There is also a lovely patio just outside this cafe with picnic tables that you can sit and have your lunch or finish up your junior ranger booklets.

If you can’t make it to Bandelier this year or just want a sneak peek before you go, their website also offers a virtual tour. You can also check there for closures due to weather or fires (which unfortunately happened recently).

Bandelier National Monument is an absolute must. Add it to your bucket list and I’m sure you will be coming back again after that first visit. 

Treetop Walk

Over the Fall Break in October, we decided to take a trip down to the Black Forest Region of Germany. It was a major area we hadn’t visited yet and it was an area that promised lots of outdoor activities and hikes. One of our favorite stops during our little road trip was Baumwipfelpfade in Bad Wildbad.

The Treetop Walk is a great family activity. It is a 3/4 mile walk to an observation tower on a smooth wooden platform (yes it is stroller friendly). 

To keep everyone entertained, they have sprinkled different activities along the way. Some are educational stops and some are fun balance activities. 

Some activities are harder than others 🙂

After a fun walk along the elevated platform you will gradually reach the tower. The tower, which appears to be a wooden tornado supported by steel, stands over 130 ft and provides stunning views of the Black Forest from the top. You may even catch a peek of the Stuttgart TV tower or the Swiss Alps. 

On the way down, you have the option of walking to the bottom or taking the slide.

O loves a good slide but wasn’t yet ready for this one 😛 

The exit at the bottom of the tower leads you directly to the entrance to the Sommerberg Adventure Forest. The Adventure Forest is a lovely outdoor playground for children with climbing towers, swings, big bouncy jump pillows and much more. However, this is an additional cost. So be aware as your kids will beg you to go here after the walk. Of course we ended up going here.

Once you are done, there is a nice walk along the forest floor that will return you to the entrance.

This photo from the walk back reminds me of the John Muir quote: “Between every two pines is a doorway to a new world.

Information for your trip:

Getting There:

This treetop walk is 2.5 hr from Wiesbaden. There is a paid parking lot at the base of the entrance path. However, this fills up quickly particularly during the summer months. The other option is parking down in the town and taking the funicular train up to the entrance. The website (baumwipfelpfade.de/schwarzwald/) has excellent information on all transportation and driving options. 

Other activities near by:

In addition to the Treetop walk and the Adventure Forest that is mentioned above, there are other fun activities in the area. The Wildline Suspension bridge is very close to the entrance of the Treetop walk and you can see this pedestrian bridge from the top of the observation tower. Mountain biking is also hugely popular in this area and you will walk by the downhill mountain bike course as you return to the entrance. In the winter, this transforms to a ski slope. There are also many thermal baths in the region. No matter your interest, you will sure to have a good time in the Bad Wildbad area. 

Where we stayed:

We stayed at the KleinEnzhof Family Resort in Bad Wildbad.  www.kleinenzhof.de/en/  This was a really nice family owned camping area. Very kid friendly with fun playgrounds, petting zoo, and indoor and outdoor pools. There was also a very large indoor recreation facility that had a small children’s play area, fitness room, games and a large soccer/basketball court.. It had a restaurant and a small store that also provided fresh baked goods in the morning. There were all different forms of accommodations including sleeping in a wine barrel. We rented the mobile home and enjoyed having our own kitchen. We felt it was very reasonably priced and would recommend.

Blühendes Barock in Ludwigsburg

The Pumpkin Festival is one of those events that is always suggested to us every Fall yet somehow we have never made it down there to see the event. That changed this year when we swung by the Blühendes Barock in Ludwigsburg on our trip down to the Black Forest. 

The Pumpkin Festival is held in the gardens surrounding the Ludwigsburg Residence. Usually there are multiple events throughout the August-November opening dates, but due to COVID almost all of these events were cancelled. We were able to see the largest pumpkin contest but missed out on the pumpkin canoe regatta.

The pumpkin festival is held mostly in the northern part of the gardens. The theme this year was music.

There were booths selling everything pumpkin from sausages to soup to soap. Even pumpkin prosecco was available. While the world’s biggest pumpkin exhibition was interesting, the true hidden gem is the dream like Fairytale Garden that is tucked in the back.

There are over 40 different fairytales that are told throughout this area. All are told in German but since they were all traditional stories it was easy for the kids to identify and understand each story. We were able to take a boat ride down the fairy stream, ask Rapunzel to lower her hair, and we found the witch in the house of sweets. Don’t worry Hansel and Gretel were safe. 

There were so many fun adventures around every corner. There was even a goose that laid golden eggs! (With tiny trinkets inside of course) 

Honestly I feel that the Fairytale garden alone is worth the trip or at least a stop over on your way to Stuttgart or other adventures. So mark this one down as another hidden gem to add to your next trip. Blühendes Barock: come for the pumpkins, stay for the stories. 

Idstein

Sometimes you don’t need to take a long road trip or a flight to visit someplace unique and full of history in Europe. Sometimes you just need to pop over to the town at the next autobahn exit. That is exactly what we did as we spent an afternoon in the neighboring town of Idstein.

IMG_0347

One of our friends lives in Idstein and helped give us the grand tour. We walked through town to admire the church and the half timbered houses. 

IMG_0364

My favorite has to be Schiefes Haus or Crooked House.

IMG_0360

The highlight of our tour though was the Hexenturm or Witches’ Tower.

IMG_0352

Before making the climb up the tower, we had to stop at the information office in town to get the key. Even this building was gorgeous. 

IMG_0362

After getting the aptly named skeleton key, we headed through the gatehouse to the tower.

IMG_0349

Once we reached the tower, we had to unlock the door, head inside and then lock ourselves inside. Not even kidding. You have to lock yourself inside the witches tower. Those are the rules. After taking it all in for a minute, we started the climb up.

IMG_0353

There are a variety of stair types that become steeper as you get to the top with the final ascent being basically a ladder. The climb isn’t strenuous but you do have to be careful.

IMG_0354

IMG_0356

You can see all of Idstein from the top.

Watchman’s view.

IMG_0358

Idstein is a great day trip particularly from Wiesbaden or Frankfurt. It is history and beauty all wrapped up in a nice little compact package.

IMG_0361

For your trip

When you get the key to the tower from the information office, you have to give them something in exchange like your car keys or cellphone. They are limiting the visits to the tower due to COVID so it would be best if you go during the week.

If you don’t have a lovely friend to give you the tour around town, don’t worry! The city of Idstein has 2 self guided walking tours listed on their website. The map for the half timbered houses can be found here: House Map

The map for the historical buildings can be found here: Historical Building Map

After our walkabout, we had a delicious lunch on the patio of Idsteiner Brauhaus. It was a nice way to finish an outing. The brewery also offers growlers of their beer to go. You can find their information here: Brauhaus

Off to our next adventure!

IMG_0367

Staubbach Falls

Of all the waterfalls in the Lauterbrunnen valley (and there are many!), Staubbach Falls is probably the most iconic. Depending on your vantage point, the falls appear to be pouring straight into town. For us, it was our cabin.

IMG_9873

Also contributing to the falls popularity, is the close proximity to town and the fact that this hike is FREE. Almost unheard of in Switzerland. We were staying at Camping Jungfrau, so the walk over to the falls was very short. From the campground:

IMG_9910

Once you get to the entrance, the hike up and back is only about half a mile. You start with a short uphill climb area.

IMG_9930

Great views at the top of this trail section.

IMG_9938

At the end of the trail, you come to a tunnel that will take you to the back section of the falls.

IMG_9931

There is a set of stairs that are followed by a rough rock path. Fair warning, this path is slick. It is behind the falls and the mist keeps this area wet almost constantly so hold on to the safety rope and wear appropriate shoes. The view is worth it though.

IMG_9934

Can you see the mist? Can you see the glacier? O is giving you a hint.

Glacier view without the water in the way. It almost looks like a cloud.

IMG_9940

Overall, super easy hike with great views and the experience of standing behind a waterfall. Can’t be missed!

For your trip

Since the falls are free to hike to and they are located so close to town, they are extremely popular. So it is best to get there early in the morning or later in the evening when the majority of the crowd is gone. The falls are lit up at night.

IMG_9877

When leaving the falls, if you continue down the road away from town you will come across a little hut that is selling coffee and ice cream. Stop immediately! This little hut is hiding a secret. They are serving some of the best ice cream in town. All of the ice cream is made in Switzerland from local ingredients and it is super yummy. I don’t know the name of the hut and it isn’t shown on google maps but trust me you want to find it.

IMG_9918

If you go a little farther down the road to the end of it (again going away from town), you will find Camping Jungfrau. There is a small grocery store and a nice restaurant located here. On Mondays and Tuesdays, the restaurant is closed but a BBQ food truck parks here instead. The truck is called New Age BBQ and it was delicious. It is hard to find good BBQ in Europe so do yourself a favor and search for these guys when you are in town.

IMG_9929

Crazy kids with food truck in back.

Happy hiking! And…. eating 🙂

IMG_9919

Furka Pass

We had been hiking around for several days so we decided to take a day off and do a drive. We headed up Furka Pass in search of the Rhône Glacier.

IMG_0150

The Furka Pass is a lovely mountain drive. The road was nicely paved the entire way with the expected sharp turns and steep inclines. It was a beautiful day so there were also lots of bikers (motor and pedal) working hard to get up the mountain.

IMG_0212

We drove straight to the “Ice Grotto” to make sure to get there early and beat the crowd (a theme for our trip). The abandoned Hotel Belvédère shares the parking lot with the ice grotto and is a beacon on the side of the mountain to help you track where you are headed on the pass. Can you see her?

IMG_0214

IMG_0204

We were able to snag a spot in the parking lot and headed to the entrance. There was a waterfall in the parking lot so that seemed like a good sign of what we would see ahead.

IMG_0153

Ok so I lied. There was some hiking on this day. You do have to hike down to the glacier from the parking lot entrance (after paying the entrance fee of course).

IMG_0199

IMG_0200

There were lots of lovely spots to stop for pictures.

IMG_0158

IMG_0163

Going into the glacier was a very surreal experience. It seems like you are stepping back in time a bit. The bubbles trapped in the ice is what really got me.

IMG_0171

IMG_0167

The path through the glacier is only about a 100m long but the kids really enjoyed exploring it.

IMG_0179

Again more amazing photo opportunities.

IMG_0170

IMG_0172

On the way back there is a short secondary trail that you can take to the other end of the glacier lake. There is a nice waterfall at the end. It also gives a better perspective of the glacier and mountains.

IMG_0154

Glad we got a chance to see a glacier before they are gone.

IMG_0196

For your trip

Lauterbrunnen to the Ice Grotto is a 1.5 hr drive (according to Google). However, you will most likely want to stop along the way for pictures so expect some extra time on that. There are lots of pull off stops and hiking along the route.

IMG_0145

There are actually several stops for food and snacks along the way. The ice grotto itself has a little cafe. The Grand Hotel sits in the valley after you have gone up and over the pass and before you drive up to the Grotto. This was a really beautiful location. At the top of the pass by Totensee is a couple hotels and several restaurants. This is also a really popular hiking spot so this place was absolutely packed when we drove by around lunchtime.

We stopped at a food truck on the way down the pass that had been recommended to us. I don’t know if the food truck has an actual name, but if you are looking for it on Google maps it has been labeled as “Lokalspezialitäten Holzofenbrot”, which is just Local speciality wood fire bread. They sell homemade bread, cheese and butter and it was amazing. Super delicious! They only speak German and of course cash only (it is the side of a mountain after all!). Oh and bring your own knife.

IMG_0156

Now I don’t want to end this post on a bad note but I do want to make sure you have realistic expectations for your trip. The tunnel that is drilled into the glacier is only done once a year and then they spend the rest of the time trying to keep it from melting. We arrived at the end of July so the tunnel had already suffered through the heat of the summer. They have placed a white tarp over the tunnel to try to protect it. Here’s the entrance.

IMG_0183

On the inside, there are some spots that have already completely melted and collapsed. It gives that abandoned Everest base camp feel.

IMG_2699

Overall, it was still a great experience and if you are doing the pass its worth the stop.

IMG_0210

 

Dwarf Trail

We heard a rumor about some friendly dwarfs living on a mountainside in Haslital area. We thought we better go investigate.IMG_0103

There are two adorable, family-friendly dwarf trails that can be found in the Haslital area. We decided on the Käserstatt trail. To get to there, you head up the gondola at Hasliberg-Twing and the trail starts right at the gondola stop.

IMG_0080

We followed this map to see if we could catch up with the busy dwarfs.

IMG_0392

We lucked out with beautiful weather and some amazing views.

IMG_0086

IMG_0090

At each stop, you find a little house (of various sizes) and usually some kind of activity. There is also a story sign at each stop (both in German and in English) that keeps the excitement going for the kids.

IMG_0091

IMG_0092

In this picture, E had to climb up a ladder and reach for the metal chain to “ring” the doorbell to see if this dwarf was home.

The bigger houses were absolutely amazing. The interiors were sparkling clean and there were so many detailed decorations in side.

IMG_0099

IMG_0101

The kids loved having to search to find the houses (and climb up the trees).

IMG_0111

IMG_0112

However, I think their favorite thing was this “cable car”.

 

The kiddos did an excellent job of hiking this trail.

IMG_0081

IMG_0123

Though E needed help from time to time.

IMG_0107

The hike is about 3 km long and the trail website estimated that it would take 1.5 hrs. It took us 2.5 hrs and I felt we could have spent more time along the trail.

IMG_0129

We tried our best but we didn’t see a single dwarf. They were always off in the forest working. 🙂 We’re glad they were willing to leave their houses open for us to explore while they were away.

IMG_0130

IMG_0135

IMG_0138

For your trip:

As mentioned above, there are 2 different dwarf trails. You have to take different gondolas to reach each one. So you will have to plan ahead of which one looks best for you.

For our trail, we parked right at the Hasliberg-Twing gondola. There is a huge parking lot there. The drive up is a mountain drive for sure with lots of twists and turns. Here’s our GPS on the way up.

IMG_0076

Thats a pretzel road if I have ever seen one.

You take the gondola up to Käserstatt and then you will walk down to the middle stop of Lischen. You then ride the gondola back down to the Hasliberg station.

There was an excellent picnic area (with restroom) about halfway through with a nice little stream that runs next to it. I would recommend bringing a change of clothes so that the kids can play in the stream for a while.

IMG_0120

The trail is based on storybooks about Muggestutz. You can find out more about this dwarf on the website and there are also free coloring/activity sheets available to print to either take with or to do before/after the hike. That website is: https://www.meiringen-hasliberg.ch/en/  and then click on Muggestutz.

Happy Hiking!

IMG_0105

Aare Gorge (Aareschlucht)

The Aare gorge is a stunning stop just outside the town of Meiringen. This was about a 40 minute drive for us from Lauterbrunnen but I had tagged this as a rainy day destination. It was an excellent choice.

IMG_0009

We got there just as the entrance was opening. There were only 2 other families in line which allowed for easy distancing (as is needed in the time of COVID). From the outside, it doesn’t look like it is going to be anything spectacular.

IMG_9996

Once inside, the gorge shares her beauty with you.

IMG_0010

IMG_0037

IMG_0018

IMG_0028

IMG_0057

IMG_0041

Part of the walk is through caves but most of it is done on wooden walkways, dangling on the edge of the cliffs.

IMG_0017

IMG_0047

IMG_0004

During this stroll through the gorge, the children are encouraged to look for the “Tatzelwurm” and its family. There are apparently multiple worms throughout the gorge.

IMG_9994

O and I looked everywhere and did not get a single glimpse of a worm. Ha! Guess we will have to go back!

After the walk, the kids got some time on the playground out front as the rain had stopped.

IMG_0059

The kids were holding up well with all the hiking so we decided our next destination would be a bit more of a challenge. That story is coming up next.

IMG_0005

For your trip:

There are 2 entrances to the Aareschlucht (East or West). The west entrance is the one that is considered more kid friendly as it has the large playground. It also has a shop and restaurant with plenty of outdoor seating.

IMG_0065

You can walk through the gorge and back, which is what we did due to very few people being present. Currently (due to COVID), they are allowing people to ride the train for free between the east and west entrances. They are trying to encourage one way traffic to reduce close contact between people and crowding. Remember a mask is required on the train so bring one with you if this is your plan.

Right next to the west entrance of the gorge is Reichenbach Falls. It is the setting for where Sherlock Holmes was murdered in the final book. There is a little funicular train that takes you up to the falls so this could easily be combined with a trip to the gorge.

If you are coming from Lauterbrunnen/Interlaken area, you will also pass the Giessbach Waterfall on the way to/from the gorge. This is a very popular waterfall to visit and could also be added to your day trip. Happy Trails!

IMG_0003